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mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his law degree from harvard law school. prior to this public service, the justice served in private practice in san francisco and sacramento. i can attest to his prowess as an attorney because on one very interesting occasion, he represented me. [laughter] on a speeding ticket. [laughter] and got me off with a mi
, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text written brian a. garner -- >> as the earlier book was. >> rose: exactly. so what did you hope to accompl
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was a day of urgent diplomacy aimed at stopping the battle of air strikes and roc
to the system do you think are required? how deep? >> please understand that current law, the president's law right now, the law of the land, makes it so that medicare, medicaid and social security all are on a road to insolvency. that's the current law. we believe that those three programs, medicaid, medicare and social security need to be saved and strengthened and secured. through our budget proposal we've had out the last two years we have put forward a proposal that actually makes it so that current retirees, current medicare recipients see no change whatsoever but in fact we save and secure the program for future generations. that the medicaid program which again is on a path to insolvency and states are complaining vociferously about this that we actually save that program from a financial standpoint. there are wonderful proposals on the table about solving and saving social security. you can't address the spending issues without fundamental really form and real solutions for medicare, medicaid and social security. >> brown: just to stay with you, won't those be unpopular? after this e
, they are mandated by law -- mr. reagan and his troops, when they read it so security in 1983-1986, they came up with federal employees retirement system. they were wanting to eliminate several services altogether. that was because of the benefits. if you have $1,000 so security retirement for your benefit ♪s. ts, it would offset your benefits by $1,000 also. you're supposed to get say 1275 and you get $1,000 worth of social security, they reduce your disability retirement by $1,000. host: got it. ♪ caller it doesn't leave you a whole lot oin there. there were a lot of private, wealthy people who cut benefits to the people who are served by them and chop it up. you figure 300 different companies are running it, they are not going to be able run it efficiently and work together. guest: the caller points out that there is a lot of this dispute that has to do with the sort of basic mathematics of benefits that are going to be owed to the postal service workers that will be retiring in the next few years. really, the crunch time is really going to be over the next 5-10 years. they are trying to
vii of the civil rights act, which as you know is our antidiscrimination law. under. the supervisors is imbued with the employer's authority. an employer can be held liable if a nonsupervisor employee harasses another employee. but it's tougher to prove. you have to shout employer knew or should have known about the harassment and failed to act. maida vance brought this lawsuit against ball state university. she's an african american woman working in the dining services division of the university, claimed she was harassed by a white coworker, was slapped on the head, blocked at the elevator, racial epithets were used such as "sambo" and "buckwheat" in her presence. she complained and finally brought her lawsuit against the university. she lost in the lower courts. the lower court, federal appellate court, said this coworker was not a supervisor, and took the definition that is probably the most restrictive-- that is, the supervisor has to be somebody who can make a tangible employment decision, such as hiring and firing. >> brown: today it made its way to the supreme court, and her l
been doing without any justification to international law whatsoever. america will be in trouble and obama is in trouble. this is a big problem for obama and his legacy. >> you hippie. >> i consider myself pro drone, but i didn't think about it. other people could have the drones too. shoot them out of the sky. >> it is going to be one big drone party there. >> michael, here is my question. where is the anti-war movement on obama? like imogen. >> internationally it is there. there was a big survey recently of 20 countries. over 50% of people in those 17 countries thought the american use of drones was outrageous. so internationally there is a big scandal about america's use of drones. >> they never have a problem with obama. >> and international communists, unreal. >> what do you think? >> you know, i am surprised the graph there and the administration said there was a concern that the believers may no longer be in our hands which is why they were trying to establish policy. they said it is totally fine to blow things up when we do it, but we don't trust the mitt romney guy. >> i
arrested for riding a man tee. she said she is new to the area and didn't realize it was against the law. there was not a sign saying do not ride the man tee. >> don't harass the manatee. >> stephanie: what's weirder than florida? germany. erotic zoos prompt germany to rein state beastalty laws. apparently they've been off the books since 1969. >> interesting hmm. wow. 1969, dude. ♪ >> stephanie: the agriculture minister -- miniature -- he's a regular size. he's not even tall enough to ride a manatee. [ speaking german ] [ laughter ] >> stephanie: a law would make it illegal for people to use animals for sexual acts of their own activities or third parties. the daily mail ties this decision to the recent rise of erothic zoos where people can -- ♪ >> stephanie: where people can visit. >> no! germans are freaks! >> stephanie: well, they can visit to have sex with animals ranging from llamas to goats. >> ok, well, of course. llamas also kick and spit. good luck with that. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: they like 'em feisty. >> i guess so! well, you couldn't reallile wear a cup. >> that defe
the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> congress returned to work today after a grueling and extended thanksgiving vacation, and to mark this solemn event, we're introducing a new series on the nation's top lawmakers. we're calling it "red, white, and true." and today we focus on the magnificent republican representative of tennessee, dr. scott -- >> i'm the conservative pro-life republican doctor, scott desjesrlais. >> as a conservative pro-life republican doctor, the congressman rode the tea party wave to washington just two years ago. but things have gotten a little tricky since then. you see, in divorce proceedings released after election day, this severely conservative pro-life republican doctor admitted to having sexual relationships with multiple women, including two of his
, it is not an automatic. if they do pursue citizenship-- which they can under the law as it is today-- they would go behind the people who are already in line so that there is a fairness in the system to those who have waited for years to become regularized. but they will have a preference in that they will be here legally, can work, and build up all of their seniority while they are waiting in the line. >> suarez: senator, would you say the prospects for a bill of this kind have changed? have gotten better since the election? >> i do think that people are now realizing that we've got to have immigration reform and speaking only for myself i believe that doing immigration reform in pieces is going to be achievable rather than trying to do comprehensive which gets bogged down in extraneous issues that make it very hard to come to a total big conclusion. >> suarez: representative gutierrez, today the hispanic caucus laid out a set of principles it would want to see in any immigration reform bills. given what you and the caucus members said today, is the senator's achieve proposal at least a place to b
down and playing cat and mouse games with the board of clerk's office about the sunshine laws pamphlet that's supposed to be in there, because in every other language there is the leaflets. but in english they seem to have a hard time so now they're saying that they're going to redo it but then i said you should take the other ones out of there and redo the whole thing but no i'm playing a cat and mouse thing but i will be back tomorrow to see if they make copies of that because that should be in the office of the board of clerks. also, i wanted to speak on hiv. as you know, the african-american and latino community is the highest, community is the highest, fastest number of new cases of-6 and harm reduction, i'm a product of harm reduction. i believe in harm reduction. it's very good because it made me a better man. i'm a very proud gay black male. so i had a lot of issues around stuff like that. so but i think we need to really, really focus on hep c because it's good to know about how to be safe,; j,v while havig rgetworld, whatever a person des they want to be in. but we have to st
money is that money, regulations -- that affected all the campaign fance laws. the citizens united decision was totally predictable as a response to mccain-fine gold. despite my working for john mccain, who had a campaign finance reform position i always thought was blazingly unconstitutional -- we have weakened the political parties and weaken the candidate committees. the political parties have been moderating influences in american politics -- the political parties goal is to assemble aajory, not to advance an ideology. the advancement of an ideology by either party is secondaryis a function of the majority. now, with all the super pac money there is incasingly ideological mey, increasing the enforcement money. reagan talked about the fact that if you are with me 80% of the time you are not my political opponent, you are my political ally. in a super p world where you have a apostate republican or an apostate democrats on an issue, you will see the enforcement of ideological discipline through the use of the super pac in a primary on either the left or the right. it has the fact
raised its head and the super committee deadlocked 6-6 which under the law left the meat cleaver to drop. the budget meat ax to drop. and that's what we're facing. we're facing something that nobody ever intended to go into effect. so how do we get out of this? we have people of goodwill that have to be reasonable and utilize a little commonsense, lessen their partisanship, lessen their ideological rigi rigidity, and that's the atmosphere that we can come together in. now, i want to tell a story and then i'm going to sit down, mr. president. i want to tell you the story about one of the brightest shining moments in government occurred back in 1983 when this senator was air youn was a youn. we were within six months of social security running out of money. and two old irishmen -- one who was president, his name was reagan; and the other one who was speaker, and his name was o'neill -- decided that they were going to do something about this. they were reasonable people who could operate in a bipartisan way and a nonideological way. and they said, what we're going to do is take this subject
greece to actually change its laws so private creditors could no longer sue to collect if enough other creditors, like the e.c.b., also owned greek debt. could that serve as model for other countries? well, once you start changing laws, says hans humes, the sky's the limit. >> right now, we're teetering on something that's far worse than what we saw in latin america. >> reporter: in the 1980s or '90s you mean. >> yeah, i mean i lived in latin america, i saw it and i was part of the workout. this is worse. >> reporter: does lee buchheit then... >> have a lot of work? ( laughter ) >> reporter: yeah, i'm sure he has a lot of work, but does he bear a lot of the blame? >> no, no. i mean he's just reacting to the situation that's evolving. but i think there's a lot of concern that, if you have this legal coaching on how to really gut creditor rights, that you may actually end up in a situion ere nobodyantsto lend to countries. >> reporter: but if that's already a clear and present danger, we wondered why not just stiff the creditors? after all the history of sovereign debt is default, defaul
to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much of a be in san francisco is to the rest of the world for social justice. i spent a number of years helping to grow a small business. i got to understand the innovative spirit in san francisco. at night, i volunteered as a neighborhood leader and as feature of an affordable housing organization. i learned so much about the challenges facing our neighborhoods and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san
put rubber gloves on and threatened to take me away. the city breaks about five laws. it used to be they just perform in the evenings and take away the people from their angst in the rain. now they take away the children's right to ascension, the people's right to talk, and the people's right to heal and use our park as we choose. they're are loud speakers going on -- >> president chiu: thank you veryzj'( ksÑ much. are there any other members of the public that wish to speak in general public comment in seeing closed. madam clerk, could we go to the adoption calendar. >> clerk calvillo: item had 3 43 is being considered for immediate -- without committee reference. the board of supervisors hold a public hearing on december 11 at 3 pm with the board sitting as a committee of the whole to consjpxe temporary construction licenses for various real properties by eminent domain for the public purpose of constructing the central subway third street light rail extension project. >> president chiu: the house has changed roll call vote. >> clerk calvillo: on item 43, supervisor avalos,
, there is absolutely no way that police and other law enforcement agencies can patrol every square inch of our border. so it can happen that he is here. it can happen that he may be hiding somewhere. it can happen that he may be hiding with some friends or it can even happen that he went somewhere else. police do believe, however, that he is in belize. they continue to search for him. >> let's hope he does the right thing and comes in and answers the questions of authorities. that will put the whole matter to rest. jorge, great to talk with you. thank you very much. we'll stay in touch. >> well, we hope that you come and visit belize, martin. i'll tell you, john mcafee will only give himself in if you turn to belize. >> thank you, jorge. >> have a good night. >> thank you. >>> to another story, the death of a television icon. a look at the long career of larrying aman and the role he relished more than any other. that's coming up. e silverado 15- still the most dependable, longest-lasting full-size pickups on the road. and now we've also been recognized for lowest total cost of ownership -- based on
the nausea? >> nothing works as well. oregon law approved requires no monitoring of a child's medical monitor use by a pediatrician. >> that's dumb. >> god forbid any of my children were sick and there could be anything that could alleviate their pain or discomfort, i would do it. no blink of an eye. >> and then you have the problem that these parents are divorced, and if one parent in that -- that parental family, if you will, decides that they don't want their child to take certain medication, then that brings in another legal rub which is what you have. >> and the dad in this case said i'm worried about what it will do to my child's brain and that's a very responsible way. >> when he saw his little girl she was stoned. >> when you're on morphine you're stoned. we're probably not competent, the three of us have never tried pot, so we're probably not -- >> not even touching that one with a ten foot pole. >> i definitely can't. go ahead. >> next topic, denied boarding death of a woman. a woman visiting overseas from hungary. tried to get back on three different flights, 425 pound, obese. had
with laws and regular 9m;'igss.. >> some products display blue berries only have the juice in them. that comes way down ond= the list of ingredients. >> ocean spray blue berry craisins are cranberries infused6ó9z with blue berry jui. consumer reports says it's best to eat them before a day or the juice ends up in pack yanled products. getting into winter, fresh fruit becomes hard to find krorkts says frozen berries retain most of the vitamins. now, coming up on abc 7 news at 5:00 results of the trouble in toyland report. which toys you may want to keep off the list or risk your child being injured. >> yes. important, thank you. >> and it's double he lism nation tonight on "dancing with the stars". so after this evening there will be three dancers left. >> you're ready to declare a champion? >> yes. we're going to dive in. >> a dance called knight rider vongra. bruno said they did it bonger style. let's take a look.wá at moves, carolyn. >> this is their second dance. to michael jackson's "dirty diana". i thought i'd show a clip from the dance because i thought you might like the e
. >> we have mother-in-law. >> had a thanksgiving emergency. cynthia was late, she was really on time. delayed a bit because she had a fire in her oven. she had to call the police and fire department. >> and they - on yeah. >> she put the turkey on before work and boom, the stove goes up. >> it was not like she was going. here i am going to work. here's the turkey. nthis happens. nthere is a lot of issues that come up on this day and that's why we are here for you. prospect of preparing your thanksgiving turkey is worrying you. forenot. we have experts. she has a business card that said that. nicole jobs is here to answer your questions. hi, nicole. better to span the gamit from the ridiculous to the fairly benign. are there ridiculous questions that come your way? nwe see over 12,000 phone calls on thanksgiving day. we are busy talking turk i. the number one question. how do i thaw my turkey. today being thanksgiving. you don't want to opt for the refrigation method. if you are calling today and forgot to start the thawing. out for the cold water bath takes half an hour per pound. it
. >> she is one of four kids in her family homeless, but then went on to earn a masters, phd and law degree. she also runs marathons and triathlons. what a gal! >>> well, california's congressional delegation is overwhelmly democratic and so is state government. grace lee shows us the republicans are trying to figure out what they are doing wrong. >> this election, whether it was in the state of california or for the nation was a little bit of a wake up call for republicans. >> reporter: on the national front californians voted in additional democrat to congress, that means 38 of the 53 districts are dominated by democrats in the house. at the state level, the senate and assembly have a super majority of democrat that is the 2/3 of the members. with both the senators staunch democrats and a demonstrate governor, where did the -- democratic governor, where did the republicans go wrong. many believe they are alienating too many voters. >> right now a sign on the outside door if you are gay, lesbian, black, latino or hispanic, etc., you are not welcome. >> reporter: the assemb
was spent by groups not required by law to disclose their donors. for more on where all that money went, what it bought, and what it means for future elections we turn to two reporters who've been tracking those numbers: matea gold of "the los angeles times." and eliza newlin carney, who covers this for "roll call" newspaper. and we thank you both for being with us. matea gold, let me start with you. most expensive election in history. how did that manifest itself? >> well, i think there's no question money played a remarkable and prominent role in this campaign in a way we haven't seen in recent years. this was the first presidential campaigns since a series of important federal government decisions, including the supreme court's decision in citizenses united that opened the door to more outside spending. that's what drove us to the record $6 billion spending you mentioned. outside groups played this enormous role, both pummeling the airwaves with ads from the presidential campaigns and senate and house races. i think there's no question they made the tenor of all the campaigns much mo
on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself, basically, until there's a constitution? >> well, he did a lot of little things. he dismissed the old prosecutor, seen as a hold-over from the old rejewel. he promised new trials. but the main thing that he did was to take all of his actions, and place them outside of court review. and he also made impossible to disband the constitutional assembly that is now writing the document. he had already assumed not simply presidential powers but legislative powers. that he did in august. what he is doing right now what, he
. >> santa claus, tooth fairy. >> reporter: alec baldwin and jude law lend their voices. and opening tomorrow, one master portraying another. anthony hopkins, hitchcock's making of psycho, and helen miren co-stars as hitchcock's wife, alma. >> i promised mother i wouldn't tell. >> oh. >> is there anything anthony hopkins cannot do? that looks great. that may be the one i check out. >> great casting. >> absolutely here. and we were talking about our favorite holiday movies earlier. my vote still is national lampooon's "christmas vacation." timelessly hysterical. you have a favorite holiday flick? >> when you are a kid and watch "home alone" what i watched growing up. every time i think of christmas i think of that. >> classic. good catch. good catch. that's the news for this half hour. follow us on face book at wnnfans.com. >> on twitter,@wnnfans. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)